Cloudways is, needless to say, a web hosting service which is focused on one thing only, cloud web hosting, hence the name. They offer a fully managed cloud hosting of which all plans have one fantastic feature: pay as you go. In other words, you only pay for the resources you need and nothing else. This makes it very user-friendly, for everyone to benefit from. Being the type of a hosting provider which focuses only on managed cloud hosting platform, it makes them one of the best at what they do. If you are looking for something else, Cloudways is not the host to go with.

I took a look at both of those sites and they seem compatible enough to where it wouldn't be out of the ordinary or conflicting in any way. Now as far as the reason why you want to do this...... idk. Believe it or not today it's more about quality than quantity. You could have a million hits a month..... how does that guarantee them they can get sales out of it? I've seen TONS of Businesses celebrate from reaching these types of milestones then a week later panic because they're not...

MangoMatter created a book review site for The Children's Book Council, a not for profit that promotes Australian children's books. Tom was helpful and engaged from the initial idea to the finished product. He gave us some very good suggestions and helped us along the way. He provided excellent training so we could manage the site ourselves and his ongoing tech assistance has been invaluable. We would highly recommend MangoMatter. 

Once you decide you price range, you need to consider how long you'll need web hosting. If it's a short-term project—say, less than a month or two—you can typically receive a refund should you cancel your hosting within 60 days. Some companies offer 30-day money-back guarantees, others offer 90-day money-back guarantees. Once again, it's beneficial to do your homework.
While we reviewed paid web hosting services, there are also some free web hosting services out there. These provided businesses and individuals with a web builder and a no-cost hosting service. While some security and integration features may be present, they won't be as robust as the paid services. Some examples of free hosting companies are Wix, WordPress, Weebly and 000webhost. Again, while these services can provide you with a good free hosting option, their capabilities will likely pale in comparison to the paid plans. If you're on a budget, it may be a good idea to start out on one of these services and then eventually transition to a paid plan.
I recommend the OP remove 1 & 1 from this as well. I had a nearly similar experience with them, and I didn’t even use them for web hosting. While you are right in what happens with expiration, it is worth noting that 1&1 makes it as difficult as possible to transfer and *will* keep your domain after it expires. Once you’re in, you’re stuck and you’re at their mercy.
For the more enterprise-oriented customers, they offer a full range of VPS and cloud hosting, along with serious Java Tomcat hosting, including shared and private JVMs, as well as Java VPS offerings. With a company named MochaHost, you'd expect some quality Java support and they have it. So brew yourself a cuppa, open a browser window, and give MochaHost a spin. You have half a year to make up your mind, so if it turns out MochaHost really isn't your cup of tea, they'll understand.
The host may also provide an interface or control panel for managing the Web server and installing scripts, as well as other modules and service applications like e-mail. A web server that does not use a control panel for managing the hosting account, is often referred to as a "headless" server. Some hosts specialize in certain software or services (e.g. e-commerce, blogs, etc.).
Alexandra Leslie’s interest in website administration was sparked in her teens, priming her for a fast-paced career in managing, building, and contributing to online brands, including HostingAdvice, Forbes, and the blogs of prominent hosting providers. She brings to the table firsthand experience in reviewing web hosts, perfecting website design, optimizing content, and walking site owners through the steps that add up to a successful online presence. Today, she combines her extensive writing experience with technical understanding to unpack some of the most complex topics that daunt novice website owners, as well as the subjects that excite veteran technologists within the HostingAdvice readership.
Domain validation (DV) is the most affordable and most common option, and it’s free with all of our top picks. This level certificate indicates that the domain is valid and the applicant controls that domain. It’s easy to obtain and doesn’t require any paperwork. On a site with DV, you’ll see a green padlock in the browser bar, and for most sites, this is plenty.
A customer needs to evaluate the requirements of the application to choose what kind of hosting to use. Such considerations include database server software, scripting software, and operating system. Most hosting providers provide Linux-based web hosting which offers a wide range of different software. A typical configuration for a Linux server is the LAMP platform: Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP/Perl/Python. The web hosting client may want to have other services, such as email for their business domain, databases or multimedia services. A customer may also choose Windows as the hosting platform. The customer still can choose from Perl, PHP, Python and Ruby but may also use ASP .Net or Classic ASP. Web hosting packages often include a Web Content Management System, so the end-user does not have to worry about the more technical aspects.
The only real issue here is that tech support is a little limited, depending on how you like to communicate your issues. Support via ticket or live chat is available 24/7 but if you want to call and speak to someone, the hours are limited to typical business hours within the US. That's not always convenient, but if a helping hand isn't an essential for you, it's fine. 
Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
Support. This is tricky to evaluate. Because the quality of support sometimes varies from one support representative to the next, we kindly ask you to share your experience in the comments section for your host. Unfortunately this also attracts fake comments (sometimes from competitors, sometimes from the hosts themselves). We try to moderate but we reckon this is not 100% failsafe.
But that is not all. User experience isn’t defined by the user panel and how frustrating it is. Sometimes, it’s the little things which make you love the hosting provider for what it is. Take FastComet for example – after you place a purchase, a live agent calls you, manually charges the account and asks, if any help is needed. Should you, for example, decide that you want some software to be installed – that can be easily done as well!
Shared hosting is web hosting in which the provider houses multiple sites on a single server. For example, Site A shares the same server with Site B, Site C, Site D, and Site E. The upside is that the multiple sites share the server cost, so shared web hosting is generally very inexpensive. In fact, you can find an option for less than $10 per month.
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