Bluehost is running a sale for 2018, with a 50% discount on all of its plans that lasts until your first renewal date. While this current sale won’t last forever, it does offer significant savings in the present: BlueHost’s cheapest year-long plan at the current price is only $35, compared to $60, the average cost of the cheapest year-long plans of our other top picks. The current discount may make it a great choice for anyone planning to upgrade their growing website in the future.


As you can see from the table above, not all cheap web hosts are created equal. Some have data transfer allotment and storage caps. Read the fine print for the unlimited offerings, however, as there are sometimes gotchas that might sneak up on you later. Other services limit what applications you can use. Some require you to upgrade to a higher tier just to get a particular feature. And then there are the bare-bones services offering just space and no built-in tools to make the process of building and maintaining a site easier. If you're a skilled coder, that might be fine. Which web host you select depends entirely on how you plan to use it—and your budget. If you are ready to select a great web hosting service that's also cheap, click the links below to check out our in-depth reviews of the best names in the space.
In this day and age, you don’t have to be a 5-star designer or experienced developer to have a website. That’s why man invented website builders — the time-saving, headache-free, web-design-for-dummies alternative to complex coding. You can point and click to add elements like photos or videos, type content into a visual editor, click one more button, and watch as it all magically appears live on the Internet. Seriously, these tools are brilliant, and it gets better:
Dedicated server hosting is often the best option for web developers when money is no object. A dedicated server allots an entire server to the client, meaning you can have that entire space to yourself and do whatever you would like with it. This opens the door to a lot of heightened performance capabilities, making them the go-to option for larger websites such as e-commerce sites, real estate directories, forums, and more. These come with a high price tag, too, so are best reserved for larger endeavours.
I recommend the OP remove 1 & 1 from this as well. I had a nearly similar experience with them, and I didn’t even use them for web hosting. While you are right in what happens with expiration, it is worth noting that 1&1 makes it as difficult as possible to transfer and *will* keep your domain after it expires. Once you’re in, you’re stuck and you’re at their mercy.
If you own a business, your company needs a website. If it doesn't have one, it should. Naturally, online businesses by definition require websites for marketing and selling products or services by definition. In the internet age, however, even local brick-and-mortar business need to at the very least be discoverable via the web (and they probably ought to be selling online, too). Word of mouth only gets you so far in this internet-centric age. These days, people discover new businesses—even local business—via Bing, Google, and Yahoo, search engines that make it incredibly simple to find companies' products, operational hours, and prices. If your business doesn't appear in the search results, especially on the first page, it'll be difficult for potential clients and customers to find you. In other words, no website, no money. You do not want that. Of course, web hosting isn't just for businesses. You may want to host a personal website for many reasons. Either way, the services here have you covered.
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