GreenGeeks doesn’t let its planet-friendly slant get in the way of its services. This host ticks every box in our evaluation checklist. In addition to boasting an independently verified 99.98 percent server uptime, GreenGeeks sites are hosted on high-speed solid-state drives, have access to multiple one-click install interfaces via the standard cPanel backend, and enjoy free nightly backups. Free hosting plans start at $3.95 per month, and come with unlimited bandwidth and storage.
That's apparent right from the moment you check out their servers. It's possible to outfit them extensively. There's the choice of operating system, hard drive type and size, and RAM, as well as how many IP addresses you require and how much outbound bandwidth should be taken into consideration. That does mean it's a little intimidating for those who are completely new to the dedicated hosting game, but it's worth taking the time to figure out. 
VPS hosting is one step up. It uses a single server, but makes virtual copies of it — even though lots websites live on the same server (just like with shared hosting) each one gets its own personal copy. You get your own IP address, root access to your individual space, increased security, and stabilized site performance. VPS hosts are still designed to handle low-to-moderate traffic levels, but if you don’t want your site’s performance to be impacted by anyone else’s, it’s worth it.

The drawback of shared hosting is that if the hosting company shares too few servers between too many clients, then your site could become dramatically slow. This can be acceptable to some level if your primary concern is price (see our cheap hosting page). However, studies have shown that if your home page takes more than 10 seconds to load, visitors will start to abandon your site. On this top 10, we restricted our selection to companies capable of delivering professional speed & quality hosting services.
When you’re ready to take your data into your own hands and run your own blog, own your own photos, and host your own apps, it’s time to find a good web host that can put it all on the web for you, give you the tools, bandwidth, and storage you need, and support you when you need help. Thankfully, there are dozens of great companies looking for your business, and this week we’re going to look at five of the best, based on your nominations.
WordPress is one of the most popular content management systems (CMS) in the world, and as such, many web hosting providers offer options that cater to this rather large niche. You can certainly host your WordPress site on a standard shared hosting plan, but by choosing a WordPress-specific option, you'll spend less time configuring and managing your WordPress installation.
Typically, once you have signed up to your chosen hosting service, you will be given the information you need in order to log into your website's control panel. This can be used to manage certain aspects of your site. You should also expect to receive promptly the additional services which were promised, such as a domain, email account, website builder etc. 
Web hosts not only host your website, they give you tools to access, create, update, and maintain it. Most of our finalists use versions of a software called cPanel to do this — it’s one of the most common and universal interfaces for web hosting. If you ever want to change between web hosts, it’s good to have a common interface between your old and new hosts, since this can make the transition easier.
Similar to the dedicated web hosting service, but the user owns the colo server; the hosting company provides physical space that the server takes up and takes care of the server. This is the most powerful and expensive type of web hosting service. In most cases, the colocation provider may provide little to no support directly for their client's machine, providing only the electrical, Internet access, and storage facilities for the server. In most cases for colo, the client would have his own administrator visit the data center on site to do any hardware upgrades or changes. Formerly, many colocation providers would accept any system configuration for hosting, even ones housed in desktop-style minitower cases, but most hosts now require rack mount enclosures and standard system configurations.
Jump up ^ March 16, 1992 memo from Mariam Leder, NSF Assistant General Counsel to Steven Wolff, Division Director, NSF DNCRI (included at page 128 of Management of NSFNET, a transcript of the March 12, 1992 hearing before the Subcommittee on Science of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, Hon. Rick Boucher, subcommittee chairman, presiding)

If you own a business, your company needs a website. If it doesn't have one, it should. Naturally, online businesses by definition require websites for marketing and selling products or services by definition. In the internet age, however, even local brick-and-mortar business need to at the very least be discoverable via the web (and they probably ought to be selling online, too). Word of mouth only gets you so far in this internet-centric age. These days, people discover new businesses—even local business—via Bing, Google, and Yahoo, search engines that make it incredibly simple to find companies' products, operational hours, and prices. If your business doesn't appear in the search results, especially on the first page, it'll be difficult for potential clients and customers to find you. In other words, no website, no money. You do not want that. Of course, web hosting isn't just for businesses. You may want to host a personal website for many reasons. Either way, the services here have you covered.
×