BigCommerce is a bit different from our other hosting plans in that it's a SaaS (software-as-a-service) provider instead of an IaaS (infrastructure-as-a-service) provider. In other words, rather than renting space on a virtual machine where you setup and configure your own site, BigCommerce provides you with an app you login to that creates and online store. 
What would make your reviews helpful is to know what your cost will be after the initial period. I’ve had a few in years past where my fee like it did with cable and satellite companies got jacked up, and up, and up into the realm of the ridiculous. Further, in two cases 1.5 decades ago, my credit card continued to be billed undr varying excuses and delays in resolution. Since my card company proved unhelpful in stopping it as well, I had a single option. I ceased subscription to the card. So, it wouldbe helpful if you could add two areas of foci. One, how much do post-initial fees increase. Two, integrity of the business, specifically customer service, and specifically again when a customer opts to cease service.
It's rare to find a web hosting provider that offers free trial periods, but luckily, money back guarantees are common. Typically, web hosts will allow you to sign up and purchase a plan, and if you find that what you bought isn't the right option for you, you can take advantage of the money back guarantee to receive a full refund of the fees you paid.
The most basic shared hosting plan starts at $2.75 per month with that price giving you unlimited storage, bandwidth, and email addresses. Things steadily ramp up depending on your needs with cloud hosting of a similar quality starting at $4.95, and a WordPress optimized solution at $5.95 per month. All those prices are dependent on you tying yourself into a three-year plan though, so be aware if you only have short term aims. 
A word of caution to hosting shoppers: The cheapest option in existence is not necessarily the best option when it comes to hosting services. There are some things you just don’t want to cut corners on — shoes for athletes, maintenance for your kid’s car, or web hosting for your business. These are not products or services you skimp on — but that doesn’t mean you can’t get some of the best hosting on the market while on a budget.
1&1 is a popular web hosting provider used by millions of companies around the world, and for good reason. It is one of the most affordable solutions on the market while guaranteeing a high 99.99% uptime across all plans. Its $0.99 shared web hosting plan doesn’t skimp on functionalities, featuring a plethora of customizable templates suitable for various industries, advanced web building tools, business applications, and 24/7 customer support.
The Hive Five is based on reader nominations. As with most Hive Five posts, if your favorite was left out, it’s not because we hate it—it’s because it didn’t get the nominations required in the call for contenders post to make the top five. We understand it’s a bit of a popularity contest, but if you have a favorite, we want to hear about it. Have a suggestion for the Hive Five? Send us an email at tips+hivefive@lifehacker.com!

Wix, Weebly, and SquareSpace — The easiest way to build a free web presence is actually to avoid traditional web hosts altogether and use a site builder. These are services that not only provide web hosting, but also help you build beautiful, robust websites in minutes. All three of the top site builders — Wix, Weebly, and Squarespace — offer free and paid options. They’re not perfect, but if you’re feeling overwhelmed by the prospect of managing your own web space, they’re a good entry-level option.
The basic package on Bluehost will run you $3.95 per month. For you to get that price though, you have to sign up for a 12-, 24-, or 36-month package. Once you sign up, you'll get a free domain and access to the site builder. You'll also be able to install Wordpress, one of the easiest and most powerful blogging and website content management systems, in just one click. In fact, Wordpress even recommends using BlueHost to start your website. 

Sadly, there is a bit of a "gotcha" to the free automatic backup service. If you're paying $3.95 a month (for the first year of hosting, then $9.95 a month), you don't get restores for free. Each restore, no matter how small or large, will cost you $19.95. I'm not sure how I feel about that. On the one hand, the company has to pay salaries to tech support reps who can handle panicking customers. On the other hand, it seems kind of mean-spirited to hit someone when they're down with an added fee. That said, getting your data back – at any price – is priceless.
We liked how Web Hosting Hub describes its new customer process. They tell new customers, "We walk you through setting up your account in a personal on-boarding call." The company has a few other wins as well. They offer an all-SSD infrastructure, automatic vulnerability patches and a custom firewall, SSH access for certain plans, free site migration and an excellent 90-day money-back guarantee. 
Right out of the gate, we’re going to make an important decision for you. Unless you’re somehow exploding onto the Internet with a huge interest in your content, we’re going to suggest that you go with a traditional shared account. Now, we have in the past urged our users to go with more solid utilities like a virtual private server or even the more expensive dedicated option. But when you get down to it, the odds of you needing either of those right out of the gate are pretty minimal. Besides, if you’re seriously considering those other two options, you don’t likely need our tips on how to find the best personal hosting. So to sum things up, just go ahead and stick with a shared account for now: You can always upgrade later.
GlowHost had the best customer service of any web hosting company we tested, endearing itself by responding to our emailed list of questions with detailed and thoughtful answers within an hour. As we sent more questions its way, by email and phone, GlowHost continued to impress with friendly and courteous conversation (although we’re pretty sure its live chat relies on a bot).
When you’re ready to take your data into your own hands and run your own blog, own your own photos, and host your own apps, it’s time to find a good web host that can put it all on the web for you, give you the tools, bandwidth, and storage you need, and support you when you need help. Thankfully, there are dozens of great companies looking for your business, and this week we’re going to look at five of the best, based on your nominations.
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Senior Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web... See Full Bio
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