Right out of the gate, we’re going to make an important decision for you. Unless you’re somehow exploding onto the Internet with a huge interest in your content, we’re going to suggest that you go with a traditional shared account. Now, we have in the past urged our users to go with more solid utilities like a virtual private server or even the more expensive dedicated option. But when you get down to it, the odds of you needing either of those right out of the gate are pretty minimal. Besides, if you’re seriously considering those other two options, you don’t likely need our tips on how to find the best personal hosting. So to sum things up, just go ahead and stick with a shared account for now: You can always upgrade later.

Shared hosting is the most basic form of web hosting, and is best for websites with low to moderate traffic — small businesses and new websites will benefit from the low cost and relative simplicity of using a common server. Your website will be located on the same server as other sites, and will share the common resources of that one server (which usually means sharing an IP address, too). Your site will be allocated a certain amount of the collective bandwidth, and it may be impacted by other sites on that same server since the server’s abilities will be affected if any one of its websites — yours or someone else’s — experiences unusually high traffic. If someone else’s site has excessive usage, your site may slow. If your site has a spike, it may be shut off by your host and you might be charged for exceeding your allotted bandwidth.

StableHost is an overall decent host, no servers in the UK though. They offer all the same features as most other hosts, with the exception of their clustered hosting technology… which increases overall scalability and speed/performance, with the added bonus that issues with other sites on the same server shouldn’t affect your site as much as it could on other web hosts.
HostFav lowest price: Both its Linux and Windows shared hosting plans starts at $2.50 per month. For Linux hosting, you gain access to a single website, 10GB website space, 512GB bandwidth, 25 FTP accounts, and 25 email accounts, among others. Meanwhile, the cheapest Windows shared hosting plan comes with a single website, 50GB website space, unlimited bandwidth, 10 email accounts, and more. Both pricing plans also includes $150-worth of marketing offers.

Uptime measures a company’s track record for keeping websites online all of the time. In a perfect world, your website would be available to readers 100 percent of the time. But companies typically only guarantee 99.9 percent uptime, since occasional technical difficulties are inevitable. We used a third-party monitoring service to verify uptime claims and spot top performers: companies that kept their websites up at least 99.95 percent of the time. Less than 1% of difference in uptime may seem trivial, but each .01% of downtime equals 52 minutes of a broken website in real time.

If you own a business, your company needs a website. If it doesn't have one, it should. Naturally, online businesses by definition require websites for marketing and selling products or services by definition. In the internet age, however, even local brick-and-mortar business need to at the very least be discoverable via the web (and they probably ought to be selling online, too). Word of mouth only gets you so far in this internet-centric age. These days, people discover new businesses—even local business—via Bing, Google, and Yahoo, search engines that make it incredibly simple to find companies' products, operational hours, and prices. If your business doesn't appear in the search results, especially on the first page, it'll be difficult for potential clients and customers to find you. In other words, no website, no money. You do not want that. Of course, web hosting isn't just for businesses. You may want to host a personal website for many reasons. Either way, the services here have you covered.
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