Another popular type of hosting that uses various resources of several clustered servers is a Cloud Hosting. Most of such hosting have a free trial period, which helps you experience all the pros and cons they have. As a rule, in such hosting you pay per space used, which saves you lots of money and, therefore, you may be sure you don't get overcharged. Cloud web hosting is widely used by those who have exceeded the space of their initial hosting and need to get a bit more. One of the greatest examples of cloud hosting are digital giants like Amazon, Google, Microsoft etc.

Since 2009, FatCow has been committed to purchasing Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) to offset its use of electricity; this year, the company will purchase enough RECs to offset its use of electricity by 200%. FatCow's commitment to the environment will prevent 999 metric tons of carbon dioxide from being released into the atmosphere, this year alone; that's equivalent to planting 213 acres of trees or taking 196 cars off the road!
GreenGeeks guarantees 99.9% uptime, though there’s no document indicating assured compensation for failing on their promises. Nonetheless, the provider makes on-boarding and launching your website fast and easy. GreenGeeks offers free website migration, free domain name, and a drag-and-drop website builder alongside a multitude of templates. Website visitors are sure to have a pleasant time browsing pages, with GrenGeeks using SSD RAID-10. For VPS, the platform comes with an easy to use VPS management portal built for easy administration.
Web hosting companies usually provide monthly or yearly terms. The longest contract terms we found from hosting companies was three years. As with any business service, the longer you commit, the lower your monthly price. Once you sign a contract, you'll usually have to pay for the service up front if you commit on yearly plans. Month-to-month plans are usually charged monthly, so you won't have to pay in full up front.

But that is not all. User experience isn’t defined by the user panel and how frustrating it is. Sometimes, it’s the little things which make you love the hosting provider for what it is. Take FastComet for example – after you place a purchase, a live agent calls you, manually charges the account and asks, if any help is needed. Should you, for example, decide that you want some software to be installed – that can be easily done as well!


GreenGeeks is one of the companies you just know is doing everything right, they’ve seen a massive growth since they went live in 2008. The reasons for their success is pretty clear once you start working with them, it’s a combination of global reach (multiple data centres around the world), awesome performance, great and pretty speedy support, and last but not least, they’re putting their energy consumption back 3 times into the grid through wind energy, which is quite amazing!
Web hosts not only host your website, they give you tools to access, create, update, and maintain it. Most of our finalists use versions of a software called cPanel to do this — it’s one of the most common and universal interfaces for web hosting. If you ever want to change between web hosts, it’s good to have a common interface between your old and new hosts, since this can make the transition easier.
A dedicated IP address (the number that locates your website within a network) isn’t necessary for domain owners who are just starting out, but it’s worth considering. There’s nothing inherently wrong with sharing an IP address but it can lead to consequences beyond your control. For example, if one of the websites on your shared server sends spam emails or engages in other illicit behavior, that website’s IP address may be blocked from other sites or services. The firewall used to block the IP won’t be able to distinguish between the offending site and yours and you’ll be blacklisted (at least temporarily) from sending emails, too.
That's apparent right from the moment you check out their servers. It's possible to outfit them extensively. There's the choice of operating system, hard drive type and size, and RAM, as well as how many IP addresses you require and how much outbound bandwidth should be taken into consideration. That does mean it's a little intimidating for those who are completely new to the dedicated hosting game, but it's worth taking the time to figure out. 
HI Marjan, Lots of third party CMS providers are pretty good at helping you set correct SEO strategies for your website. They are built with that interest in mind because they know their customers are looking at that, so their platform are really straight forward. Choosing between CMSs and providers is a matter of how you find the platform easy to use, to take advantage of and to integrate with your other resources, and actually cost effectiveness play an interesting role in here...
In particular, Web Hosting Hub uses BoldGrid as a site builder. BoldGrid is actually an add-on to WordPress, so there's no lock-in. This overcomes the major problem of most site builders: you're locked into that host and that tool, often requiring you to completely rebuild your site if you want to expand. By using a WordPress-based solution, all of the rather considerable power of WordPress is available for future expansion.
Managed Wordpress hosting accounts are also available starting at $119 for 5 TB of monthly data transfers, 10 domains, and 100 GB of storage. Even Cloud hosting begins at $59 per month and works its way up to nearly $1000 depending on your configuration. Introductory offers are available but for the first three months rather than a full year like with other web hosting sites. 
If you’re looking for a cheap web host, you probably don’t need much power right now, but you might some day. Both our top picks offer an upgrade path for sites that garner too much traffic for a simple shared server to handle. There’s no hard-and-fast rule for when to upgrade, but if your site grows in popularity and starts to slow down, consider talking to your host about upgrading to a VPS or dedicated server.
Web hosting allows businesses, organizations, and individuals to make their websites or apps visible on the internet. Whether they're using a dedicated server, or sharing resources, every website is hosted on a server. The only way for a website to be visible on the internet is if it's hosted by a web hosting service provider, also known as a web host. In order to find a website, you type the domain name (or URL) into your browser. Your computer will then connect to the server where the website is hosted, and the webpage is delivered onto your screen.
Moving to another website consists of transferring the website’s files and databases, configuring your site with the new host, and directing your domain’s DNS to the new host. Once you pick a new site host, they can usually help you out with this process. The cost will depend on the host you’re switching to, but it will probably be anywhere from $150-$400.
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