Hostinger is a VPS and cloud hosting provider that focuses on three key aspects: server stability, fast performance, and great customer support, all of which are available at a budget price. Both its shared hosting and VPS services are optimized for WordPress, with its powerful SSD storage capable of boosting your website speeds. Its yearly plans comes with daily/weekly backups to keep your data safe and sound at all times.

Whether you’re a website beginner or an expert, you need the right set of tools to get started. For beginners, we prioritized companies that didn’t charge exorbitant fees for WordPress or daily backups. Wordpress is one of the easiest ways to get a blog up and running without requiring you to design one from scratch. All of our finalists offered a Wordpress installation button, but we preferred hosts who didn’t upcharge for it. Website backups ensure that, if your site does go down, you’ll still be able to recover your data. If you’re running your website solo, the easiest way to ensure you’re backed up is to go through your web host.
The most advanced shared hosting option is the Prime plan. It also starts at $6.95/month. This option totally opens up the amount of resources that you can use. You get an unlimited number of sites. You get an unlimited amount of space. You have access to unmetered bandwidth. Even though you still get one domain included, you can park as many domains as you want. You also get unlimited sub-domains, unlimited email accounts, and unlimited storage. This is on top of the extras, which include privacy protection and site backups.

Next was Gate.com. I forgot the reason I signed up on them (as I was already using BlueHost at that time) but I remember clearly how terrible was the deal. They were charging around $150 a year (not a very cheap rate by 2005 market standards) but allowed only one domain and imposed strict limitation in server usage. To make things worse – Gate.com was often inaccessible due to server outages.


A domain must be unique (for example there can only be one single Yahoo.com) and must be registered with a domain registrar (ie. NameCheap); while for sub domains, users can freely add it on top of the existing domain as long as their web host provide the service. Some would say sub-domains are the ‘third level’ domains in the sense that they are simply “sub folders” under the domain root directory, normally used to organize your website content in different languages or different categories.
WordPress Hosting: Launched in 2003 as a blogging platform, WordPress has become a powerful content management system that powers around 26% of websites today. Consider a managed WordPress hosting package optimized for WordPress.  If you want to spend less of your time managing the security and performance your WordPress website, and more time building your WordPress-powered website, then this might be the type of web hosting for you.
You also want a web host with 24/7 customer support—if not by phone, then at least by chat. Forums, knowledge bases, and help tickets are all well and good, but sometimes you just need to communicate with another human to get things ironed out as quickly as possible. That said, not all 24/7 customer support teams are equal. Companies like GoDaddy and Liquid Web boast incredibly knowledgeable and helpful customer support squads—a fact that we confirmed in our in-depth reviews of those web hosting services.

If you're not sure of the type of hosting your business needs, you might want to start small, with shared Web hosting. You can always graduate to a more robust, feature-rich package of, say, VPS hosting or even dedicated hosting in the future. Unfortunately, some hosts don't offer all hosting types. Consider how much you expect to grow your website, and how soon, before you commit to anything longer than a one-year plan. It's worth spending the time up front to make sure that the host you select with is able to provide the growth you envision for your site, as switching web hosting providers midstream is not a trivial undertaking.
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