Another popular type of hosting that uses various resources of several clustered servers is a Cloud Hosting. Most of such hosting have a free trial period, which helps you experience all the pros and cons they have. As a rule, in such hosting you pay per space used, which saves you lots of money and, therefore, you may be sure you don't get overcharged. Cloud web hosting is widely used by those who have exceeded the space of their initial hosting and need to get a bit more. One of the greatest examples of cloud hosting are digital giants like Amazon, Google, Microsoft etc.

Steep renewal prices may be industry standard, but it doesn’t mean you have to pay them. You can always move to another host to take advantage of another new customer discount. Many hosts offer free migration to make this easier. But before you make any drastic decisions, try simply asking your current host for a cheaper rate. These companies want to keep your business, so saying you’re thinking of moving to another host may get you a discount on your renewal.

Pay a little more at $4.99 per month (rising to $9.99 after a year) and everything switches to unlimited. In both cases, there's automated installation options for popular software like Wordpress and Joomla so, in theory, you're only moments away from launching a simple blog or site setup. There's access to the 1&1 Website Builder too, which enables you to choose from a series of site templates to set up your own website that also includes social media fields and comment boxes. We'd be inclined to suggest you stick with something more Wordpress-based if you're new to website design though. It's much more flexible. 
This is unfortunate because, these days, owning a website is becoming a crucial part of running a successful business, and more and more folks are establishing a web presence for their personal brand as well. You can use hosting to sell online, store and share your portfolio, or even publish your freelance writing samples and resumé. Yet, even the basics — What is web hosting? — can be lost on the average web user.
Amazon Web Services offers cloud web hosting solutions that provide businesses, non-profits, and governmental organizations with low-cost ways to deliver their websites and web applications. Whether you’re looking for a marketing, rich-media, or ecommerce website, AWS offers a wide-range of website hosting options, and we’ll help you select the one that is right for you.
According to GreenGeeks, each web hosting company is responsible for up to 1,390 pounds of CO2 every year, just for consuming the power it needs to run its servers. With tens of millions of servers worldwide and counting, web hosting’s carbon footprint will only grow. GreenGeek is a 300 percent green company, meaning it buys three times as much green energy as it uses and pumps that clean, wind-farm energy back into the local electrical grid. It’s also a recognized EPA Green Power Partner. How many web hosts can say they’re doing something nice for the planet?
Moving to another website consists of transferring the website’s files and databases, configuring your site with the new host, and directing your domain’s DNS to the new host. Once you pick a new site host, they can usually help you out with this process. The cost will depend on the host you’re switching to, but it will probably be anywhere from $150-$400.
GoDaddy offers one more hosting package than HostGator. The Economy plan is great for people planning on launching a small website. On the other hand, the Deluxe and Ultimate packages are for those looking to start multiple sites with more advanced features and the Business Hosting plan is optimized for high traffic and e-commerce. Each includes advanced features like unmetered bandwidth and Microsoft Office Business emails. You also get 1GB of database storage for free with every package. 

There are a lot of web hosting companies – we started by analyzing over 40 companies – so it can be difficult to wade through the pages of service details to determine which companies provide the best services. In a space where it can be easy for companies to hide behind terminology and faulty promises, it can be hard to differentiate the service that will keep your business's website humming from the one that could drive customers away because of slow load times.


Web hosting is a very legitimate need for most individuals and businesses. Unfortunately it is also an urgent need for hackers and spammers of many kinds. These people will always try to sign up for cheap hosting accounts, especially if there is an x months for free promo. Worse: they will also sign up for more expensive hosting accounts using stolen credit card info!
If you don't care about having your own domain and don't want to do a lot of behind-the-scenes tweaking, you should really consider one of these online website builders, as they let you create surprisingly attractive yet functional sites hosted under their domains. Furthermore, these services can be incredibly cheap: Some offer free plans, though that generally means you'll have branding on your site for the website builder's company. You can often pay to get your own domain, and that generally removes the branding as well. But if you need some control over your domain and need a little bit more functionality, web hosting is the way to go.

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Though Wix is priced a little higher than others on the list, it's one of the best start-from-scratch systems out there. Some of the features Wix is known for are a blog hosting, e-commerce hosting, iOS and Android apps. Wix websites look great on high-resolution devices. You can also send out newsletters or give your viewers access to membership systems, which is a pretty cool bonus. 
Ben, I would amen what Ali has said already. $160/month is $1920 a year and almost $6 over 3 years. It might be convenient for the low monthly price but it adds up over time. You don't need to do it yourself but I'd recommend working with a web development professional. Depending on how complex your eCommerce needs are, you can probably get something for $3000-5000. Our company falls right in the middle of that for eCommerce sites. If you are selling something that requires more...
Sadly, there is a bit of a "gotcha" to the free automatic backup service. If you're paying $3.95 a month (for the first year of hosting, then $9.95 a month), you don't get restores for free. Each restore, no matter how small or large, will cost you $19.95. I'm not sure how I feel about that. On the one hand, the company has to pay salaries to tech support reps who can handle panicking customers. On the other hand, it seems kind of mean-spirited to hit someone when they're down with an added fee. That said, getting your data back – at any price – is priceless.
For VPS, users have access to a user-friendly control panel that makes it easy to accomplish various tasks, including rebooting your private servers and quick installs for web scripts. Conducting data backup and restoring files and databases can be done in a few button clicks, with double RAID protection ensuring crucial data are safe in the cloud.
When it comes to server operating systems, Linux is typically the default option. Still, some services offer a choice of Linux or Windows hosting. If you have specific server-side applications that require Windows, such as SQL Server or a custom application written in .NET, then you need to make sure your web host has Windows hosting. But don't let the idea of a Linux host intimidate you. Nowadays, most web hosts offer a graphical interface or a control panel to simplify server administration and website management. Instead of typing at the command line, you'll click easily identifiable icons.
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