A good web host will grow with your website over time: that means it’s best to go for tiered service options that allow you to toggle your price and features as your site develops. Even if you start off on the cheapest plan, it’s good to have the convenience of levelling up with the same host rather than needing to start from scratch with a new company and contract when your website takes off.


Steep renewal prices may be industry standard, but it doesn’t mean you have to pay them. You can always move to another host to take advantage of another new customer discount. Many hosts offer free migration to make this easier. But before you make any drastic decisions, try simply asking your current host for a cheaper rate. These companies want to keep your business, so saying you’re thinking of moving to another host may get you a discount on your renewal.
Choosing is simple: select hosting that will support the script, platform, or CMS you want to use. And if you aren't sure, go for Linux hosting. For example, WordPress will run on Linux and Windows, but hosts generally recommend that you run it on Linux. However, if you want to use a Windows-specific technology like ASP.NET, you'll need a Windows host.
Organizational tools are also included, such as free billing software and free domain reselling too, so you're good to go with your business right from the get go. It's not as cheap as some competitors but uptime is high and customer support is speedy and knowledgeable, while not being too intimidating. The 90-day money back guarantee is suitably reassuring too.

Shared Hosting: Is one of the most common and cheapest forms of web hosting. It is more than suitable enough for many small business and personal blogs. You can expect to pay between $4 and $10 per month for this type of web hosting. With shared hosting you are renting disk space on a shared Linux-based server with many other websites, which means you’re also sharing things like RAM, processing power & bandwidth. This can often mean that once a website begins to gain a lot of traffic or start to take up a lot of these shared resources it will be time to consider upgrading to one of the other forms of web hosting mentioned on this page.


Shared hosting is ideal for smaller-scale websites and projects you’re looking to build. Shared hosting has more limitations than other web hosting options available, but for most smaller websites like blogs, biz sites, and personal websites, these are limitations you will likely never even notice unless your project becomes much larger than you initially anticipated. This cheap web hosting type works by a provider offering server space on the same server to many different clients; your website will not be affected by the other websites on the server, and your limitations will only lie in the fact that you are splitting the bandwidth, storage space, and more, with the other clients operating out of that server space (as briefly described in our SiteGround review). Also keep in mind that even the cheapest hosting packages usually come with 1-click installers for the most popular CMS’s like WordPress, Joomla, etc. Also, the majority of UK web hosts also offer shared packages for both Linux & Windows hosting (and of course support common languages like MySQL, PHP, etc).
You'll even receive an email from Softaculous informing you when new versions of the software you've installed are available. You can log right into your cPanel account and update your software with a click of your mouse within the Softaculous interface. This will ensure that you have the most up to date features helping keep your site both secure and performing well.
That's apparent right from the moment you check out their servers. It's possible to outfit them extensively. There's the choice of operating system, hard drive type and size, and RAM, as well as how many IP addresses you require and how much outbound bandwidth should be taken into consideration. That does mean it's a little intimidating for those who are completely new to the dedicated hosting game, but it's worth taking the time to figure out. 
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How quickly your website displays for your customers depends, in part, on how close to the web host server your customers are. We focused on US-based servers in this review, requiring companies to have at least one data center in North America. We preferred web hosts with additional data centers — if you live in Texas but your readers are all in the UK, it's useful to have a web host with servers in London — but we didn’t require it.

You gain the most web-building functionality if you create a self-hosted site. This typically involves transfering the free WordPress CMS to server or signing up for a web host's optimized WordPress plan. With an optimized plan, the host automatically handles backend stuff, so you don't have to worry about updating the plug-ins and CMS, and enabling automatic backups. In these instances, the WordPress environment typically comes pre-installed on the server.
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