Shared hosting is the most basic form of web hosting, and is best for websites with low to moderate traffic — small businesses and new websites will benefit from the low cost and relative simplicity of using a common server. Your website will be located on the same server as other sites, and will share the common resources of that one server (which usually means sharing an IP address, too). Your site will be allocated a certain amount of the collective bandwidth, and it may be impacted by other sites on that same server since the server’s abilities will be affected if any one of its websites — yours or someone else’s — experiences unusually high traffic. If someone else’s site has excessive usage, your site may slow. If your site has a spike, it may be shut off by your host and you might be charged for exceeding your allotted bandwidth.

Website hosting providers usually offer far more than just space on a server, many web hosts provide a full package to allow the website owner all the tools they require for their website. Most shared hosting plans come with a control panel which gives the user a simple to use interface to setup email address, add databases, FTP access to upload their website, backups, statistics, ecommerce shopping carts, and many scripts like WordPress blogging, or Joomla CMS. Many web hosting services also give you a free domain name, free advertising credits and a few other free bonuses so you choose their service.
Telling someone what I do for a living is always an interesting experience. Either we’re totally in sync, both lost in conversation about WordPress woes or some time-saving program update, or it’s me talking with crickets in response. There’s just something about web hosting. It’s hit-or-miss whether someone is up to speed on the nuances of all that this industry has to offer.
Can someone share what is the cheapest in the long -run? All of these just have a offer that will last max 3 years and then after that the price spike is 80% on all of them. I don’t think ( nor do I know) if you can jump from host site to host site taking advantage of their sign up offers of $3 a month but it looks like there is no way to avoid paying $9 a month for the lifetime of my website!
1&1 is an ultra popular web hosting provider that routinely shows up on lists in both the US and Europe — and it's not surprising how it got there. It's well priced, offers plenty of features, and is pretty straight forward. When it comes to shared hosting, the Basic package starts at only 99 cents per month for a year with that price rising to $7.99 per month after the first year. For that tiny sum, you get 100GB of storage, one website, 25 databases, 500 email accounts, a free domain name, SSL certification, and 24/7 customer support. 
It's important to understand that at some point, the company is going to raise your prices. Ask the sales team when this will occur – it could be after the first month, year or the next time you try and renew your contract. If you're happy with your services, it may be worth it to pay the higher rates. If you're not satisfied, however, it's a good idea to have an exit plan as well.

Every business—from sole-proprietorships to enterprises—needs a website. That said, not every business needs an ecommerce presence, and not everyone can afford one, either. Sometimes, you just need a simple page listing your hours and location, with maybe a little blogging functionality to keep things interesting—and sometimes that's all you can afford, too. Cost is a critically important consideration when selecting a web host. But while it's a truism that you get what you pay for, it's also true that every penny counts and that there are some great web hosting deals to be had.
The answer is simple – your computer may break, be turned off or electricity could go down. When your computer is down, so is your website – so it’s better to trust a dedicated hosting provider to take care of that for you. Just below, you’ll even find a tool, which helps to monitor the availability of every page on the web and see, so you can see how their servers perform.
WordPress is one of the most popular content management systems (CMS) in the world, and as such, many web hosting providers offer options that cater to this rather large niche. You can certainly host your WordPress site on a standard shared hosting plan, but by choosing a WordPress-specific option, you'll spend less time configuring and managing your WordPress installation.
Since 2009, FatCow has been committed to purchasing Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) to offset its use of electricity; this year, the company will purchase enough RECs to offset its use of electricity by 200%. FatCow's commitment to the environment will prevent 999 metric tons of carbon dioxide from being released into the atmosphere, this year alone; that's equivalent to planting 213 acres of trees or taking 196 cars off the road!

Downsides to HostGator include the lack of a free domain and the cPanel interface looks a little dated. First-time users might find the crowded layout confusing. If you use WordPress, however, you won’t need to access the cPanel. HostGator’s own site administration is not as sleek as Bluehost’s (number two on our list of best small business web hosters).
With the basic plan, you get access to one website, 50GB of disk space, and a few domains and email accounts. This option is available at $2.95/month to start. The plus and prime offer unlimited space and websites. They grant unlimited parked and sub-domains. They also come with unlimited email accounts and email storage. These plans both start at $5.45/month. All plans have unmetered bandwidth.
Regardless, we recommend going with an SSD-based web host whenever possible. Want to go even cheaper than the web hosts on this list? Consider one of these free and easy-to-use web hosts, but be aware of the downsides to using a free web host 10 Ways That Free Web Hosting Is Bad for Your First Website 10 Ways That Free Web Hosting Is Bad for Your First Website Free web hosts can get your website online without you spending a dime. But it's a bad idea. Here are ten reasons why you should buy some web hosting from the start. Read More .
FatCow's actions have not only inspired Moo Crew members who have made simple changes in their daily routines to contribute to the effort, but also our customers who proudly display their Green Server badges on their websites. Every FatCow customer is given a badge that they can place on their website to let visitors know that they're surfing a website backed by eco-friendly web hosting services. To learn more about FatCow's eco-friendly, visit our Green Hosting page.
This is unfortunate because, these days, owning a website is becoming a crucial part of running a successful business, and more and more folks are establishing a web presence for their personal brand as well. You can use hosting to sell online, store and share your portfolio, or even publish your freelance writing samples and resumé. Yet, even the basics — What is web hosting? — can be lost on the average web user.
Many web hosts do include a website builder of some kind — whether a simple “fill out this form” tool that publishes a single page, or a more in-depth program with dozens of templates and customizations — but it’s not the focus of their business. An actual website builder, like SquareSpace or Weebly, will have the most robust set of tools to help you customize your website.

When it comes to server operating systems, Linux is typically the default option. Still, some services offer a choice of Linux or Windows hosting. If you have specific server-side applications that require Windows, such as SQL Server or a custom application written in .NET, then you need to make sure your web host has Windows hosting. But don't let the idea of a Linux host intimidate you. Nowadays, most web hosts offer a graphical interface or a control panel to simplify server administration and website management. Instead of typing at the command line, you'll click easily identifiable icons.
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