As with Bluehost, GreenGeeks also offers a variety of support options by phone and online. However, its response times aren’t as quick as Bluehost’s. The company's phone lines are only open Monday to Friday 9am – midnight and Saturday to Sunday 9am – 8pm and the expected response time for its emails is 15-20 minutes. Similarly, its live chat claims to be 24/7, but we were told agents were unavailable several times while trying it. Still, if you can tolerate a short wait, GreenGeeks does offer solid customer service once it gets back to you.


A customer needs to evaluate the requirements of the application to choose what kind of hosting to use. Such considerations include database server software, scripting software, and operating system. Most hosting providers provide Linux-based web hosting which offers a wide range of different software. A typical configuration for a Linux server is the LAMP platform: Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP/Perl/Python. The web hosting client may want to have other services, such as email for their business domain, databases or multimedia services. A customer may also choose Windows as the hosting platform. The customer still can choose from Perl, PHP, Python and Ruby but may also use ASP .Net or Classic ASP. Web hosting packages often include a Web Content Management System, so the end-user does not have to worry about the more technical aspects.
HostFav lowest price: Both its Linux and Windows shared hosting plans starts at $2.50 per month. For Linux hosting, you gain access to a single website, 10GB website space, 512GB bandwidth, 25 FTP accounts, and 25 email accounts, among others. Meanwhile, the cheapest Windows shared hosting plan comes with a single website, 50GB website space, unlimited bandwidth, 10 email accounts, and more. Both pricing plans also includes $150-worth of marketing offers.
Spec-wise, GlowHost and FastComet are pretty neck-and-neck, but GlowHost does provide a few additional server locations in Australia and the US. Theoretically, this means GlowHost is more flexible in how quickly it can serve websites up to customers across the globe, but this benefit is primarily for its higher service tiers: If you’re signing up for shared hosting, our rep told us that you’ll most likely be assigned a server based in Salt Lake City or Phoenix.

That's both good and bad. It means you can utilize an attractive design that works just as well on a smartphone as it does a desktop, but you're limited in terms of scope and what else you can do with that webspace. It's also a little more expensive initially than a shared hosting package, at about $12 per month for a personal site or $18 for a business package, which adds e-commerce features. 

Downtime means that people can’t reach your site which can be frustrating to potential visitors while also costing you traffic and revenue. Additionally, if people aren’t able to reach your site the first time, they may not try again. That said, hosting providers provide minimum uptime guarantees which is a guarantee that they’ll have your site up and running that percent of the total hours in a day.
You can also host your website on WordPress.com, but that's different from the kind of hosting mentioned above. WordPress.com uses the same code from WordPress.org, but it hides the server code and handles the hosting for you. In that sense, it resembles entries in our online site builder roundup. It's a simpler but less flexible and customizable way to approach WordPress hosting. It's definitely easier, but if you want to tinker and adjust and optimize every aspect of your site, it might not be for you.
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