While we reviewed paid web hosting services, there are also some free web hosting services out there. These provided businesses and individuals with a web builder and a no-cost hosting service. While some security and integration features may be present, they won't be as robust as the paid services. Some examples of free hosting companies are Wix, WordPress, Weebly and 000webhost. Again, while these services can provide you with a good free hosting option, their capabilities will likely pale in comparison to the paid plans. If you're on a budget, it may be a good idea to start out on one of these services and then eventually transition to a paid plan.

Steep renewal prices may be industry standard, but it doesn’t mean you have to pay them. You can always move to another host to take advantage of another new customer discount. Many hosts offer free migration to make this easier. But before you make any drastic decisions, try simply asking your current host for a cheaper rate. These companies want to keep your business, so saying you’re thinking of moving to another host may get you a discount on your renewal.
Similar to the dedicated web hosting service, but the user owns the colo server; the hosting company provides physical space that the server takes up and takes care of the server. This is the most powerful and expensive type of web hosting service. In most cases, the colocation provider may provide little to no support directly for their client's machine, providing only the electrical, Internet access, and storage facilities for the server. In most cases for colo, the client would have his own administrator visit the data center on site to do any hardware upgrades or changes. Formerly, many colocation providers would accept any system configuration for hosting, even ones housed in desktop-style minitower cases, but most hosts now require rack mount enclosures and standard system configurations.
You can host your web site or photo gallery with Linode, but unlike other traditional hosting companies that offer shared hosting solutions, Linode offers Virtual Private Server hosting (VPS) where you spin up a virtual server with the memory, disk space, and file transfer that you need for whatever application you’re building or web site you’re hosting. Some users even use their Linode servers as remote desktop replacements, others use it as private, cloud-based application servers, and others use them to host their webapps, developed applications, and blogs. You get full SSH and root access on your servers, guaranteed resources, and your choice of linux distro on the servers you purchase. Prices vary depending on the type of server you’re looking for and the resources you want it to have, but start at $19.95/mo. You can check out all Linode’s offerings here.

JustHost has three Linux-based shared hosting plans, each priced quite reasonably. The Basic plan starts at $3.95/month and lets you set up a single site. You get 50GB of disk space, unmetered bandwidth, and one domain name included. That also comes with the ability to park five separate domains and 25 sub-domains. The basic plan gives you five email accounts and a total of 100MB of email storage.
You can also host your website on WordPress.com, but that's different from the kind of hosting mentioned above. WordPress.com uses the same code from WordPress.org, but it hides the server code and handles the hosting for you. In that sense, it resembles entries in our online site builder roundup. It's a simpler but less flexible and customizable way to approach WordPress hosting. It's definitely easier, but if you want to tinker and adjust and optimize every aspect of your site, it might not be for you.
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