Some site owners subscribed to VPS or dedicated hosting simply because of their ego – with the kind of mindset where they think they are different and better. But that’s not true. In fact, I know some small business owners who have switched over to dedicated hosting when they didn’t need it, and they have regretted it. They have spent money on unnecessary server resources and expert technical assistance when shared hosting would have been fine.
Great list! I have always found Hostgator to be a great hosting company and at that $2.99 offer that’s a pretty good deal. Bluehost I’ve had billing issues with and iPAGE is not great on performance like you show in your report.Hostinger I haven’t heard of before but based on your review I might try them out as a cheaper alternative for some of my basic sites.Thanks for the information!
If you already own a server, you can co-locate it in one of Contabo’s data centers. They operate their two own data centers in Germany (Munich, Nuremberg). Both feature latest air-conditioning and UPS technology. Customer base ranges from private users to businesses. Their customer support is available on 365 days per year via E-Mail and telephone. Additionally, many upgrade options are available which help you to customize your server. Read More
Believe it or not, the location of your server still matters. Consider where the users are that are going to be trying to access your website, and your ideal server would be the one located closest to that point that has reasonable powerful. If the closest server is significantly underpowered, you’d be doing yourself a favour to use one a bit further away. It really doesn’t matter if you’re looking for city-specific services like web hosting in London, Birmingham, or Leeds… the speed difference will be negligible as long as the server is close-ish, or in, the UK (both SiteGround and A2 Hosting have servers world-wide).

Telling someone what I do for a living is always an interesting experience. Either we’re totally in sync, both lost in conversation about WordPress woes or some time-saving program update, or it’s me talking with crickets in response. There’s just something about web hosting. It’s hit-or-miss whether someone is up to speed on the nuances of all that this industry has to offer.
Believe it or not, the location of your server still matters. Consider where the users are that are going to be trying to access your website, and your ideal server would be the one located closest to that point that has reasonable powerful. If the closest server is significantly underpowered, you’d be doing yourself a favour to use one a bit further away. It really doesn’t matter if you’re looking for city-specific services like web hosting in London, Birmingham, or Leeds… the speed difference will be negligible as long as the server is close-ish, or in, the UK (both SiteGround and A2 Hosting have servers world-wide).
Think of the relationship between web hosting and a domain name similar to building a new home. A domain name is actually how your visitors will find you. Just as your new home needs an address so people can find you, so does your website. And just as you need a plot of land to build your house on, you need a web hosting service to put your website on.
Bluehost starts its shared hosting plans at $4.95/mo, and for your money you get unlimited bandwidth, unlimited disk space, unlimited file transfer, unlimited email, a free domain registration, and more. Even their basic plans offer unlimited hosted domains, domain parking, e-commerce features, and more, including one-click Wordpress installs, databases, and more. You can check out all of Bluehost’s features here.
Can someone share what is the cheapest in the long -run? All of these just have a offer that will last max 3 years and then after that the price spike is 80% on all of them. I don’t think ( nor do I know) if you can jump from host site to host site taking advantage of their sign up offers of $3 a month but it looks like there is no way to avoid paying $9 a month for the lifetime of my website!

Web hosting companies usually provide monthly or yearly terms. The longest contract terms we found from hosting companies was three years. As with any business service, the longer you commit, the lower your monthly price. Once you sign a contract, you'll usually have to pay for the service up front if you commit on yearly plans. Month-to-month plans are usually charged monthly, so you won't have to pay in full up front.
On the plus side, SiteGround offers free automatic daily backups, access to the Cloudflare CDN, high-performance SSDs for all plans, unlimited email accounts, and integration of the free LetsEncrypt SSL certificate into sites. The company does limit bandwidth and storage, but even those who claim to offer so-called unlimited bandwidth and storage really have some limits in their terms of service.

Another popular type of hosting that uses various resources of several clustered servers is a Cloud Hosting. Most of such hosting have a free trial period, which helps you experience all the pros and cons they have. As a rule, in such hosting you pay per space used, which saves you lots of money and, therefore, you may be sure you don't get overcharged. Cloud web hosting is widely used by those who have exceeded the space of their initial hosting and need to get a bit more. One of the greatest examples of cloud hosting are digital giants like Amazon, Google, Microsoft etc.
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Senior Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web... See Full Bio
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